Living with cerebral palsy

At SpeechAngel our goal is to assist anybody that is living with a condition of restricted mobility. This includes diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s but a further important example is cerebral palsy. The condition severely limits casual, everyday movement and affects eight hundred thousand people in the United States alone.

We’re keen for people to understand not just what we’re doing but also why we’re doing it.

To get an idea of what in can be like to live with mobility limitations first hand, we highly recommend that you give Jesse Bauer’s blog a read. Diagnosed in 2009, Jesse explains the ups and downs, trials and tribulations of living with cerebral palsy.

Understand this disease through Jesse’s eyes 🙂

Best wishes,

The SpeechAngel team.

Meeting with activist Dick Cochius

This weekend the SpeechAngel team are out in Holland meeting with Dick Cochius! During our time there we’ll be interviewing Dick to find out more about his experiences and his condition.

Dick lives with spinal muscular atrophy and is a prominent activist who has been very vocal on the subject of disability.

Information and comments from Dick will be available on the SpeechAngel website next week!

Best wishes,

The SpeechAngel team.

The difference between speaker-dependent and speaker-independent recognition software

We’d like to let you know a little more about our product at SpeechAngel and give a short explanation of speech recognition 🙂

There are two types of speech recognition. One is called speaker-dependent and the other speaker-independent. Speaker-dependent solutions are found in specialsed use cases where there a limited number of words that need to be recognized with high accuracy, while speaker–independent software is more often found in telephone applications.
Speaker–dependent software operates by learning the unique, individual characteristics of a single person’s voice, in a way similar to voice recognition. New users must first “train” the software by speaking to it, so the computer can analyse the way in which the person talks. This usually means users have to read a few pages of text to the computer before they can use the speech recognition software.
Speaker–independent software is designed to recognise anyone’s voice, so it requires no training. This means it is the only concrete option for applications such as interactive voice response systems — where businesses can’t ask callers to read pages of text before using the system. The downside is that speaker–independent software is generally speaking less accurate than speaker–dependent software.
Speech recognition engines that are speaker independent generally deal with this fact by limiting the grammars they use. By using a smaller list of recognized words, the speech engine is more likely to correctly recognize what a speaker said.
This makes speaker–independent software ideal for most IVR systems, and any application where a large number of people will be using the same system.

We hope this paints a clearer picture!

Best wishes,

The SpeechAngel team.